Footstools with Meaning

They may not have received much attention on normal days. But Saturday, May 21 was certainly not a normal day in the lives of the footstools of First Reformed Church. At the East Jersey Olde Towne Village in Piscataway, Middlesex County offered an archaeology symposium on two excavation sites in New Jersey. One of them was First Reformed Church. Here, archaeologists helped twice in recent years to prepare the property for construction work: First in 1995 when we built the breezeway, and then again in 2014-15 when we prepared for the construction of Dina’s Dwellings. Mark Nonestied, museum’s curator and Division Head at the County’s Cultural & Heritage Commission, gave the presentation on our church. He ended with an introduction to the world of our footstools and their owners throughout history. It was fun and interesting and also highly informative to learn whose feet had all been supported once by these stools.


About Rev. Dr. Hartmut Kramer-Mills

Hartmut Kramer-Mills, a native of Jena, Germany, began his theological education at Heidelberg University. After the Middle Exam in 1986 he received a scholarship from the World Alliance of Reformed Churches for McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. He graduated from McCormick with a Master of Divinity in 1988. He graduated from Marburg University in Germany with the Ecclesiastical Exam in 1990, and received a Dr. theol. from Greifswald University, Germany, in 1997. From 1990 to 1991 he was vicar at St. Wenzel in Naumburg, Germany. He was ordained minister of word and sacrament in 1993 through the Protestant Church of the Church Province of Saxony. From 1993 to 1998 he served as assistant pastor in Stoessen, Goerschen, and Rathewitz, Germany. At the same time he was lecturer for Church History at Erfurt College in Germany. From 1999 to 2000 he served the Spotswood Reformed Church in New Jersey as interim pastor. Since 2000 he and his wife serve the First Reformed Church in New Brunswick, New Jersey, as co-pastors.
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